Association for Mental Health Alternatives: AMHA

Mission

Guided by the principles of choice,empowerment, self-determination,  and unity of purpose, the Association for Mental Health Alternatives (AMHA) is a human rights organization that advocates for self-help and alternatives to established mental health systems.  We struggle to replace the present system with ones that are user-driven and voluntary.  We strive to end discrimination and abuse in the lives of persons who use, have used, or have been used by the mental health systems.  We seek full rights in housing and community, opportunities for education and employment, and an enjoyable quality of life.

Agenda

Self-Help and Alternatives

We support he full and sustained funding in every community of alternatives and additions to established mental health systems that are determined and governed by the people that use them.

Mental Health System

Recovery and healing, not social control, must be the goal and outcome of mental health systems; therefore, all mental health systems must be voluntary and client-driven.

Discrimination

As a recognition of our dignity: discrimination, abuse, ostracism, stigma, stereotyping and other forms of social prejudice must be identified and vigorously opposed at every opportunity.

Housing

All persons, including persons identified as "mentally ill," are entitled to adequate and permanent homes of their choice.

Employment

US: We support the Americans with Disabilities Act and The Rehabilitation Act.  We must take every opportunity to be gainfully employed in occupations where we can contribute.

Benefits

All persons with disabilities, including people with "psychiatric disabilities," are entitled to sufficient income, social supports, and comprehensive health care to enjoy an adequate quality of life.

Contact Person:
George Ebert
Mental Health Alternatives
770 James St Rm 102
Syracuse NY 13202
voice US: 1 800 654 7227
voice: 1 315 475 4120
fax:  1 315 475 1531

Established December 1996, Orlando,FL.  This statement last revised March 1997.